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WHAT   IS   MY   LEARNING   STYLE?

Scoring:

The numbers in the boxes below are examples only.  These are NOT your scores.  To find your scores, see the previous page.  The examples below are to demonstrate how you may interpret your scores.

First, determine if you may be a multi-sensory learner.  Look at your visual, auditory, and tactile/kinesthetic scores from the previous page.  Take the two highest scores, and subtract them from each other to determine the difference.  If the difference is either 0, 1, or 2, you may be a multi-sensory learner.  For example, if your scores were:

  Visual Learner:                       
  Auditory Learner:                         7  -  5  =  2        You may be a multi-sensory learner.
  Tactile/Kinesthetic Learner:  



If the difference is not 0, 1, or 2, look at the largest number to see what type of learner you might be.  For example, if your scores were:

  Visual Learner:                       
  Auditory Learner:                         9  -  4  =  5        You may be an auditory learner.
  Tactile/Kinesthetic Learner:  



If you haven't done so already, calculate your score from the previous page.  Just follow the directions above.

Now that you know what type of learner you may be, let's see what this means.  Find your learning style below.


Visual Learner:

A visual learner learns best when information is presented visually.  This means that the more the learner is able to see the information, the easier it may be for that learner to learn the information.  Some of the things a visual learner might need to use may be: textbooks, worksheets, written notes, maps, flash cards, diagrams, written directions, notes on index cards, notes on the blackboard, information on posters, bulletin boards, written outlines, graphic organizers (a kind of written diagram used for outlining or seeing relationships between concepts), drawings, and pictures.

A visual learner may prefer to study using the materials just listed.  The learner may prefer to use a highlighter (a light colored marker) on a page in a book, to highlight important information.  If this is not allowed as the learner does not own the book, make photocopies of the pages so that the learner may do this.  Another study method is to use flash cards for review.  Keep the flashcards neatly organized, by topic, in an index card box.

If the visual learner is presented with an activity that is not highly visual in nature, change the activity to accommodate the learner's needs.  For example, let's say the visual learner must remember the information presented at a lecture.  A lecture is primarily an auditory presentation (using hearing rather than sight).  An example of changing this activity to a visual presentation might be to get permission to tape the lecture.  Later, the learner would listen to the tape and transcribe the notes into written form.  The learner would then be able to study the written notes, which is now a visual presentation.  The learning method in this example, has changed from a purely auditory presentation, to an activity requiring visual input.  Some other ideas might include seeing if the learner is able to read about the activity before actually listening to the lecture.  Explain to the lecturer that you are a visual learner.  See if you can get a copy of the notes from the lecturer.

Now that you know a little more about your learning style, see if you can match or adapt activities to increase your learning success.

If you intend to purchase a  "2LEARN" LEARNING PLAN  , please remember your visual learning preference when answering questions:   #27, 57, 63, 65, 67, and 70.  You would answer "a" to these questions.


Auditory Learner:

An auditory learner learns best when information is presented auditorally.  This means that the more the learner is able to hear the information, the easier it may be for that learner to learn the information.  Some of the things an auditory learner might need to use may be: discussion groups, lectures, tape recorder, cooperative learning (where information is discussed within a group), directions discussed by the teacher before an activity is attempted, listening to books read to the group, books on tape, information put to songs, silly sayings that help you remember information (mnemonic devices), and recited poems of information.

An auditory learner may prefer to study using the materials just listed.  The learner may prefer to listen to study material on tape.  He/she may also wish to set information to music.  After singing the song that was created, see how much faster an auditory learner is able to retain the information.

If the auditory learner is presented with an activity that is not highly auditory in nature, change the activity to accommodate the learner's needs.  For example, let's say the auditory learner must remember the information presented in a textbook.  A textbook is a visual presentation (using sight rather than hearing).  An example of changing this activity to an auditory presentation might be, to get someone to make an audio cassette tape of the chapter to be studied.  The learner would listen to the tape a number of times.  The learner would then be able to study the textbook chapter, which is now an auditory presentation.  The learning method in this example, has changed from a purely visual presentation, to an activity requiring auditory input.  Label the tape and keep it in an indexed box.  This way, the tape may be easily located for future review.  Some other ideas might include teaching the learner to subvocalize.  This means to whisper quietly under your breath.  If a learner must glean information from written material while working in a quiet group, the learner may whisper under his/her breath, thus adding auditory input to a visual activity.  When working alone, the learner may wish to read out loud.  Teaching the learner to put information to music, poems, or sayings is another auditory method.  Sing or repeat study information out loud.  Notice how an auditory learner can remember every word to a song, but may have trouble quietly studying a few spelling words from index cards.  If the learner sings those spelling words, you will see a difference in the learner's ability to retain the spelling information, with less effort.

Now that you know a little more about your learning style, see if you can match or adapt activities to increase your learning success.

If you intend to purchase a  "2LEARN" LEARNING PLAN  , please remember your auditory learning preference when answering questions:   #27, 57, 63, 65, 67, and 70.  You would answer "b" to these questions.


Tactile/Kinesthetic Learner:

A tactile/kinesthetic learner learns best when information is presented using touch and movement.  This means that the more the learner is able to touch, manipulate the materials used to present the information, or use his/her body movements, the easier it may be for that learner to learn the information.  Some of the things a tactile/kinesthetic learner might need to use may be: a typewriter, computer keyboard, sand in a sand tray, blackboard, letter or word magnets, concept models that may be taken apart, stamp pad letters and numerals, gross motor materials (materials requiring large muscle movement), dioramas, and manipulatives.

A tactile/kinesthetic learner may prefer to study using the materials just listed.  The learner may prefer to study by re-writing his/her notes, typing them on a typewriter, or writing them on a computer.  In fact, a tactile/kinesthetic learner may need to write, and re-write his/her school notes, over and over and over again, in order to study.  He/she may like to use sign language, physically using hand and finger movements, to help remember concepts.  Pretending to write words in the air, or on one's leg is another method.  A tactile/kinesthetic learner needs to move, build, investigate, and physically create concepts.  Unconvential study methods involving movement may be employed.  Bouncing a ball, doing jumping jacks, or jumping rope, while saying ones study information (cadence), are examples of study activities requiring movement.  Drumming, tapping one's feet, or marching, while reciting information, are other examples.  Tactile/kinesthetic learners will focus on the physical movement to the rhythm to support their learning.  Having the learner write the information in large letters on a blackboard, requires large muscle movements.  Writing information with your finger, in a tray lightly covered in sand, is another tactile presentation.  The idea is to add movement and touch to any learning activity.

If the tactile/kinesthetic learner is presented with an activity that is not highly tactile/kinesthetic in nature, change the activity to accommodate the learner's needs.  For example, let's say the tactile/kinesthetic learner must remember the information presented at a lecture.  A lecture is primarily an auditory presentation (using hearing rather than touch and movement).  An example of changing this activity to a tactile/kinesthetic presentation might be to get permission to tape the lecture.  Later, the learner would listen to the tape at home and physically act out the information.  The learner needs to be able to add touch and movement to the presentation.  Let's say the learner wants to remember specific social studies facts.  The learner might play a game of social studies charades, where classroom peers in a study group would have to guess the concept that was being acted out.  If the learner is in school, try to find teachers that use hands-on activities during their presentations.  Request those particular teachers.

Now that you know a little more about your learning style, see if you can match or adapt activities to increase your learning success.

If you intend to purchase a  "2LEARN" LEARNING PLAN  , please remember your tactile/kinesthetic learning preference when answering questions:   #27, 57, 63, 65, 67, and 70.  You would answer "c" to these questions.


Multi-Sensory Learner:

A multi-sensory learner learns best when visual, auditory, and tactile/kinesthetic presentation methods are all employed to learn a particular concept.  This means that the more the learner is able to see, hear, touch, manipulate the materials used to present the information, and use his/her body movements, the easier it may be for that learner to learn the information.  To determine the types of materials a multi-sensory learner might use, look at the suggestions for visual learners, auditory learners, and tactile/kinesthetic learners above.  Basically, you are combining these three presentation methods, when you employ a multi-sensory method.  Look at your visual, auditory, and tactile/kinesthetic scores from the previous page.  You will find that you scored almost the same in either two, or three of these learning style categories.  You don't have one particular learning style preference, but rather a combination of two or three styles.  The discussion below will focus on a multi-sensory learner that needs all three learning style areas.  If your scores suggest you only need two learning style areas, adjust your presentations accordingly.

In regards to studying, a multi-sensory learner will need to combine study methods from the visual, auditory, and tactile/kinesthetic areas outlined above.  For example, you might look at a learning fact on an index card, while reading the fact out loud, followed by re-writing the fact in large letters on a chalkboard, and tracing your finger through the chalk letters while repeating the words.

If the multi-sensory learner is presented with an activity that is not highly multi-sensory in nature, change the activity to accommodate the learner's needs.  For example, let's say the multi-sensory learner must remember the information presented at a lecture.  A lecture is primarily an auditory presentation (using hearing).  An example of changing this activity to a multi-sensory presentation might be to get permission to tape the lecture.  Later, the learner would listen to the tape at home, write down notes in a notebook, use a graphic organizer (a kind of written diagram used for outlining or seeing relationships between concepts), and physically act out the information.  The learner needs to be able to incorporate all three learning styles into a learning method.

Now that you know a little more about your learning style, see if you can match or adapt activities to increase your learning success.

If you intend to purchase a  "2LEARN" LEARNING PLAN  , please remember your multi-sensory learning preference when answering questions:   #27, 57, 63, 65, 67, and 70.  You would answer "d" to these questions.

        Learning Styles Identifier (c) 2003 Thinkwell Corp.   http://www.2learn.org     http://www.4homework.org





2 Learn educational resources including an individualized learning plan, free games and activities, education forum, free greeting cards, auction, newsletter, and more.