YOU ANSWERED "YES" TO THIS QUESTION:

5. Is the student easily distracted during learning activities?

The following information would have been added to your learning plan, based upon this response:


The student may need to be interviewed and observed to determine which things within the learning environment increase his/her distractibility. The student may need a modified learning environment to limit such distractions. Some suggestions for working with a student that may be easily distractible might include:

1. Break down complicated, multi-step directions into smaller attainable units.

2. When lecturing the student, use gestures to maintain the student's interest and focus.

3. Position the student within close proximity to the source of focus. For example, seat the student at the front of the classroom.

4. Use props whenever possible during lectures. Maps, pictures, models, etc., encourage added interest.

5. Limit visual and auditory distractions that interfere with the student's focus. For example, close the windows and door to the classroom during class instruction times. Make sure the radio and television cannot be heard from the student's working area at home.

6. Provide a partitioned area (or study carrell) for the student's use, during independent working times.

7. Depending upon the severity of the student's distractibility, the student may need to be evaluated to determine if any physical reasons are attributing to the problem.

8. Make sure the student's hearing is intact. Also determine if the student is hypersensitive to sound.

9. Make sure the student's vision is intact. Also determine if the student is hypersensitive to visual stimuli.

10. You may wish to allow the student to use headphones to limit auditory distractions during quiet work times (no music or sound, just quiet headphones that cover the ears).

11. Make the student aware of the time he/she needs to remain on task. Initially require shorter time periods, extending the time requirements when the student is ready.

12. Determine if the student has any food or environmental allergies.

13. Have the student work in small groups to accomplish a task (cooperative learning activities are ideal). The student will need to be an active participant in the learning process. The student's peers will also tend to focus the student, as they have a vested interest in the outcome of the activity.

14. Use a timer to increase the amount of time the student needs to remain on task. Increase the amount of time as the student becomes proficient. If the timer becomes more distracting than helpful, discontinue its use.

15. Provide interesting activity choices.

16. Offer a variety of choices in which the student might demonstrate concept proficiency. For example, let's take the concept of why the American Revolution began. The student might choose one of the following: write a report, write and act out a play, make a mural and explain it to the class, take an oral test on the subject, make a diorama, or use the internet to find information on the topic to share with the class.

17. Present activities one at a time. Too many things to do at one time may further distract the student.

18. Alternate "quiet' with "physically active" assignments.


NOTE: THE MANY DIFFERENT SUGGESTIONS YOU WOULD RECEIVE BASED UPON THIS ONE QUESTION, AND THIS ONE RESPONSE.

ALSO NOTE: THERE ARE OTHER QUESTIONS ON THE LEARNING PLAN THAT ARE DESIGNED TO FURTHER DEFINE THIS AREA OF NEED.